Alex Gibson

June 2013 exhibit at the Community Fine Arts Center

 

ARTIST STATEMENT

 

A Priori
Divergent Histories in an Increasingly Virtual Existence

Memory and history are, in theory, two sides of the same coin.
The former is a personal recollection of an event, and the latter, is an official aggregate of multiple individuals’ memories and artifacts that when assembled together, construct the accepted series of events.
Artifacts and documents are items that “saw” an event happen, a fingerprint, a photograph, they are evidence, reference-able proof that something happened.

Like any statistical analysis however, this aggregate is subjective and is interpreted differently by different individuals or groups.

In our increasingly virtual world, understanding and knowledge are becoming arrived at more and more frequently through deduction and research. This type of understanding is called ’a Priori’ it is truth without direct observation.
I am not implying, “all research is unreliable” but it does potentially complicate the accuracy of the specific history, this evidence is trying to support. I say specific history because, as I stated earlier, different groups use evidence to create different sometimes completely opposed histories. Which then begs the question, who is right?

I contest that they both are, it just depends on how you define ‘right’.

I define ‘right’ based on its effect on the individual who believes it, and I define belief as a balance of two extremes, observation and faith. In the absence of either, the other will take over the role of deciding how any given series of events transpired.

Each panel in this show is a composite document that depicts a specific time and place in the life of my friend James. In 2010, a Petersburg jury ruled that he probably committed suicide.
Although this history comes from a credible source, there is no evidence that acceptably supports their conclusion enough to contradict my belief that he has intentionally disappeared, that he still exists somewhere…